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Microsoft Launches Windows 10 on ARM

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Brett Howse:

The first PCs will be the ASUS NovaGo, which is a convertible laptop, and the HP ENVY x2 convertible tablet.

This is exciting news on a couple of fronts. The Qualcomm Snapdragon 835, which was the processor first announced for Windows 10 on ARM, offers reasonable performance, but with lower power consumption than what we’ve been used to in the PC space, and especially in low-power states. Without having the devices in-hand, we still don’t know how the SD835 compares in performance to the competition. We should finally be able to answer that soon though.

[…]

Battery life should also be a big win, and while we don’t have our own tests done yet, Microsoft’s information is claiming up to 30 days of standby and up to 22 hours of active use, while the detachable tablet-style HP ENVY x2 is claiming up to 20 hours of active use.

Peter Bright:

Branded as Always Connected PCs, the new Windows on ARM systems are positioned as bringing together the best of PCs and smartphones. They have PC form factors, with the productivity enabled by a real keyboard, touchpad, and general purpose operating system capable of running regular Windows software, but they bring with them the seamless switching between LTE and Wi-Fi, instant on, multiple working day battery life, and slimline, lightweight packaging that we’re accustomed to on our phones.

[…]

The emulator runs in a just-in-time basis, converting blocks of x86 code to equivalent blocks of ARM code. This conversion is cached both in memory (so each given part of a program only has to be translated once per run) and on disk (so subsequent uses of the program should be faster, as they can skip the translation). Moreover, system libraries—the various DLLs that applications load to make use of operating system features—are all native ARM code, including the libraries loaded by x86 programs. Calling them “Compiled Hybrid Portable Executables” (or “chippie” for short), these libraries are ARM native code, compiled in such a way as to let them respond to x86 function calls.

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nickoneill
343 days ago
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tagged for 6 months in the future when I want to find an article to go with the Apple announcement to say "microsoft did it first"
san francisco
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Our tiny autonomous killer drone future

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The very beginning of Attack of the Killer Robots by Sarah Topol features this quote by Stuart Russell, a Berkeley computer science professor. It is terrifying:

A very, very small quadcopter, one inch in diameter can carry a one- or two-gram shaped charge. You can order them from a drone manufacturer in China. You can program the code to say: "Here are thousands of photographs of the kinds of things I want to target." A one-gram shaped charge can punch a hole in nine millimeters of steel, so presumably you can also punch a hole in someone's head. You can fit about three million of those in a semi-tractor-trailer. You can drive up I-95 with three trucks and have 10 million weapons attacking New York City. They don't have to be very effective, only 5 or 10% of them have to find the target.

There will be manufacturers producing millions of these weapons that people will be able to buy just like you can buy guns now, except millions of guns don't matter unless you have a million soldiers. You need only three guys to write the program and launch them. So you can just imagine that in many parts of the world humans will be hunted. They will be cowering underground in shelters and devising techniques so that they don't get detected. This is the ever-present cloud of lethal autonomous weapons.

They could be here in two to three years.

Who needs a hug?

Tags: crime   drones   robots   Sarah Topol   Stuart Russell
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nickoneill
810 days ago
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Finally a valid use case for those face detection foiling dazzle makeup jobs
san francisco
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2 public comments
fxer
809 days ago
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Voting Trump if he makes the wall high enough to keep out drones
Bend, Oregon
satadru
809 days ago
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The strongest argument I've ever seen against the advancement of battery technology. ;)
New York, NY

Olympic athletes will sport Visa's new payment ring in Rio

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For those making their way to this year's Olympic games in Rio this August, Rio, Visa will be the only card accepted at official venues -- a pretty sweet deal for the credit provider. But, rather than be satisfied with exclusive access to the wallets of a... a half millio...
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nickoneill
895 days ago
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Visa is the only card accepted at the olympic games? Mark this down as another instance of "Putting the Customer last marketing"
san francisco
sirshannon
894 days ago
Pretty sure everything other than Olympic Committee profits are tied for last on the list of things important at the Olympics.
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Augmented reality desktop with Oculus DK2 and prototype color Leap Motion

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totally into this, though I'd guess the mouse/keyboard would be more convenient [via
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nickoneill
1234 days ago
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I'll take two please.
san francisco
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The Population Bomb defused

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In the 1960s, the idea of an overpopulated planet took hold, sparked by the publication of The Population Bomb by Paul Ehrlich.

The battle to feed all of humanity is over. In the 1970s hundreds of millions of people will starve to death in spite of any crash programs embarked upon now. At this late date nothing can prevent a substantial increase in the world death rate.

Ehrlich advocated radical population control methods, including voluntary incentivized sterilization, a tax on things like diapers, and adding chemicals to temporarily sterilize people into the food and water supply. Retro Report has a look at how the Population Bomb was defused by a combination of different factors, including urbanization, the Green Revolution, and a decrease in poverty.

Tags: books   Paul Ehrlich   The Population Bomb   video
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nickoneill
1242 days ago
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san francisco
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Richard Feynman: fire is stored sunshine

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In 1983, the BBC aired a six-part series called Fun to Imagine with a simple premise: put physicist Richard Feynman in front of a camera and have him explain everyday things. In this clip from one of the episodes, Feynman explains in very simple terms what fire is:

So good. Watch the whole thing...it seems like you get the gist about 2 minutes in, but that's only half the story. See also Feynman explaining rubber bands, how trains go around curves, and how magnets work.

Tags: physics   Richard Feynman   science   video
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nickoneill
1327 days ago
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Life, from the perspective of a tree
san francisco
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